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Okay, apparently I’m enjoying quick lists and bright colors! I love the short bursts of useful tips that you can use in your writing area. Said is one of the most common words in writing, so here are 100 different ways to write it. This keeps things fresh and helps us stretch our vocabulary.

100 words

 

Until Next Time…


It’s been an abundantly busy several weeks, but I’ve missed everyone and wanted to say hi!

As writer’s we are always searching for new ways to say something. I found a great list and a fun chart. I hope you enjoy!

Different Ways to say

Until Next Time…

 


I find one of the most talked about topics in writing is “show don’t tell”. It doesn’t seem to matter how much I try not to I still do, and I also find myself repeating words or not describing actions well.

I stumbled on this list of body language for us to keep near us while writing.

body-language-for-writers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

he lowered his head
she hung her head
he ducked
she bowed her head
he covered his eyes with a hand
she pressed her hands to her cheeks

she raised her chin
he lifted his chin

her hands squeezed into fists
his hands tightened into fists
she clenched her fists
she balled her fists
he unclenched his fists
her arms remained at her sides

he shrugged
she gave a half shrug
he lifted his shoulder in a half shrug
she gave a dismissive wave of her hand

she raised a hand in greeting
he waved

she held up her hands
he lifted his hands
she held up her palms
he threw his hands in the air
she brushed her palms together
he rubbed his hands together
she made a steeple of her fingers
he spread his hands
she gesticulated
he waved his hands
she clapped her hands
he snapped his fingers
she held up a finger
he pointed
she gestured with a thumb
he jerked his thumb toward…
she extended her middle finger toward him
he gave her the finger
she gave him the thumbs up

she put her hands on her hips
she shoved her hands in her pockets
he jammed his hands in his front pockets
she rested a hand on her hip
she jutted out her hip

she folded her arms
he crossed his arms over his chest
she hugged herself
he wrapped his arms around himself
she rocked back and forth

she spread her arms wide
he held out his arms
she held out her hand
he extended a hand

he shook his head
she nodded
he bobbed his head
she tilted her head
he cocked his head
she inclined her head
he jerked her head in the direction of…
she turned her face away
he looked away

his breaths quickened
she panted
she was breathing hard
his chest rose and fell with rapid breaths
she took in a deep breath
he drew in a long breath
she took in a sharp breath
he gasped
she held her breath
he let out a harsh breath
she exhaled
he blew out his cheeks
she huffed
he sighed
she snorted

she laughed
he giggled
she guffawed
he chuckled
she gave a bitter laugh
he gave mirthless laugh
she tittered
he cackled

she rubbed her shoulder
he kneaded his shoulder
he rolled his shoulders
she tensed her shoulders
he massaged the back of his neck
she rubbed her temples
she rubbed her hands on her thighs

she ran her hand through her hair
he threaded a hand through his hair
he raked his fingers through his hair
he shoved his hair back away from his face
she toyed with a lock of hair
she played with her hair
she twirled her hair
she wrapped a curl around her finger
she tucked a lock of hair behind her ear
she undid her ponytail and shook out her hair
she tossed her hair
he buried his hands in his hair
he stroked his beard
he scratched his beard

she tugged at her earlobe
he bit a nail
she chewed on a cuticle
she picked at her nails
she inspected her fingernails
he plucked at the cuff of his shirt
she picked a piece of lint from her sleeve
he adjusted the lapels of his jacket
she fiddled with her earring / bracelet
he twisted the wedding ring on his finger
she played with her cell phone
he tugged at his shirt collar
he adjusted his tie
she smoothed down her skirt

she scratched her nose
he scratched his head
he rubbed his forehead
she rubbed her eyes
she pinched the bridge of her nose
he held his nose

she slapped her forehead
he smacked his forehead
he facepalmed
he slapped a hand over her mouth
she covered her mouth with her hand
she pressed her fingers to her lips
he held his finger up to his lips
he rubbed his chin

she pressed a hand to her throat
he clutched his chest
he leaned against the wall
she bounced on her toes
she jumped up and down
he tapped his foot
she stomped her foot

she folded her hands in her lap
she drummed her fingers on the table
he tapped his fingers on the table
he slammed his hand on the table
she pounded her fist on the table
she set her palms down flat on the table
he rested his hands on the table
she set her hands on the table, palms up
he leaned back in his chair
she hooked her feet around the chair legs
he gripped the arm of the chair
she put her hands behind her head
he put his feet on the desk
he fidgeted
she jiggled her foot
he swung his leg
she crossed her legs
he uncrossed his legs
she crossed her ankles in front of her
she stretched out her legs in front of her
he sprawled out
he put his feet on the desk

she cringed
he shuddered
she flinched
he shivered
she trembled
his body shook
she cowered
he shrank from…
she huddled in the corner

he pulled away
she jerked away
he turned away
she jolted upright
he stiffened
she straightened
he tensed
he jumped
she jumped to her feet
he stood up
she rose from her seat

she relaxed
he hunched
she slouched
her shoulders sagged
his shoulders slumped
she wilted
he went limp
he rolled his shoulders
she squared her shoulders

she clasped her hands behind her back
he puffed out his chest
she thrust out her chest

he propped his chin on his hand
she rested her chin on her palm
he yawned
she stretched

he turned around
she whirled around
he pivoted
she reeled

she stepped away
she drew nearer
he leaned closer
she inched forward
he loomed closer
he paced
she shifted from one foot to the other
he swayed on his feet
she dragged her feet

she pumped a fist
he thrust his fists in the air
she punched the air

Keep writing!

Until Next Time…


I thought this was pretty amazing.  If anyone finds the images in color please let me know.

amazing-facts-about-writing-and-the-brain
Until Next Time…

Laugh On Monday!


If this doesn’t make you smile on a Monday,  you’re a tough crowd. This is from grammarly.com

“Ever make an embarrassing grammatical mistake that other people judged you for? Of course you have; we’ve all made grammatical errors at some point. Now, imagine being stuck with one of those mistakes for the rest of your life. Believe it or not, people get misspelled or grammatically incorrect tattoos more often than you could imagine. How hard is it to do a quick Google search before permanently writing your biggest mistake ever?”

Tattoo Misspelling

 


grammar tattoo 2

Keep learning and keep writing.

Until Next Time…

Publishing Scam


scam-alert-picI don’t think I’ve ever posted about publishing scams, but we all know they are out there. I’m a subscriber to Indies Unlimited and they reached out asking if I would post this information concerning new scams. Since we are all writers, I thought it would be a good post.

Many Independent Authors Have Escaped from Predatory Publishing

Arlington, VA (April 7) – More than a quarter of independent authors who responded to a recent survey at IndiesUnlimited.com said they definitely had, or might have, fallen victim to a predatory publisher before turning to self-publishing. The survey results were published on the blog this week.

Indies Unlimited conducted the unscientific survey as part of its #PublishingFoul series, which featured true stories from scammed authors throughout the month of March.

“Although our 115 respondents were self-selected, I think our results are pretty accurate,” said staff writer and former journalist Lynne Cantwell, who created the survey. “For example, 76% of our respondents said they had placed just one book with their predatory publisher. That’s in line with what the biggest vanity publisher, Author Solutions, has said about its own business.”

Nearly half – 47% – of the survey respondents reported losing less than $500 to their questionable publisher. However, another 31% reported losing more than $1,000, and one author admitted to losing more than $5,000.

Cantwell said it’s easy to blame the victim for falling for these scams – but that’s unfair. “‘Buyer beware’ only goes so far when you’re dealing with a professional con artist,” she said. “Someone new to the world of publishing is usually so flattered by a publisher’s interest in their work that they don’t even think to do a web search to see if it’s a scam. And that’s what these predatory publishers count on. That’s how they keep their businesses going.”

Twenty-eight percent of authors responding to the survey said they had reported their bad experience to an authority. Typically, reports like these are made to a state attorney general’s office, or to a watchdog organization like Writer Beware. However, two respondents said they had kept the incident to themselves because they were afraid that their publisher would sue them if they complained publicly.

Indies Unlimited co-administrator K.S. Brooks said the website decided to do the month-long series after hearing numerous stories from authors who had been scammed. “Some of these stories just break your heart,” she said. “There’s a ton of advice out there on the web about avoiding predators, but not many first-person accounts. So we decided to give these authors a chance to tell their stories, in the hopes that others would read them and think twice about signing up with a scammer.”

“At Indies Unlimited, we cover all facets of independent publishing, from writing and editing to publishing and marketing,” said founder Stephen Hise. “We hope our #PublishingFoul coverage will be a resource for authors for years to come.”

Indies Unlimited has been named in Publishers Weekly as one of the top six blogs for independent authors. The website is http://www.indiesunlimited.com.

 

Until Next Time…

Homonymns and More


I’ve gotten some more great tipsfromautocrit. This software has proven it’s worth to me over and over. I hope you enjoy the information.

Do you cringe when someone sends you an email and uses “there” instead of “they’re?” Me, too—and so do most readers.
That’s why we have the Homonym Analysis.
 
 
This nifty analysis helps you identify both homophones and homonyms so you can be sure you’re using the right word. 

Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings

: knew and new; too, to and two; or cite, sight and site, for instance.

Homonyms are words that are spelled the same but have different meanings. For example: Bear, to carry; and Bear, the animal that hibernates all winter.

The AutoCrit Editor highlights each potential homonym found in your writing.  When you click on the highlighted word, suggested alternate words are displayed (see figure below).  You can replace the word in question by clicking on one of the alternates displayed.



And if you’re not sure if you have the right one, just click the word and alternatives will display. A quick scan and you will be good to go!

 
Happy editing!
Until Next Time…
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