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I thought this was pretty amazing.  If anyone finds the images in color please let me know.

amazing-facts-about-writing-and-the-brain
Until Next Time…

Laugh On Monday!


If this doesn’t make you smile on a Monday,  you’re a tough crowd. This is from grammarly.com

“Ever make an embarrassing grammatical mistake that other people judged you for? Of course you have; we’ve all made grammatical errors at some point. Now, imagine being stuck with one of those mistakes for the rest of your life. Believe it or not, people get misspelled or grammatically incorrect tattoos more often than you could imagine. How hard is it to do a quick Google search before permanently writing your biggest mistake ever?”

Tattoo Misspelling

 


grammar tattoo 2

Keep learning and keep writing.

Until Next Time…

Publishing Scam


scam-alert-picI don’t think I’ve ever posted about publishing scams, but we all know they are out there. I’m a subscriber to Indies Unlimited and they reached out asking if I would post this information concerning new scams. Since we are all writers, I thought it would be a good post.

Many Independent Authors Have Escaped from Predatory Publishing

Arlington, VA (April 7) – More than a quarter of independent authors who responded to a recent survey at IndiesUnlimited.com said they definitely had, or might have, fallen victim to a predatory publisher before turning to self-publishing. The survey results were published on the blog this week.

Indies Unlimited conducted the unscientific survey as part of its #PublishingFoul series, which featured true stories from scammed authors throughout the month of March.

“Although our 115 respondents were self-selected, I think our results are pretty accurate,” said staff writer and former journalist Lynne Cantwell, who created the survey. “For example, 76% of our respondents said they had placed just one book with their predatory publisher. That’s in line with what the biggest vanity publisher, Author Solutions, has said about its own business.”

Nearly half – 47% – of the survey respondents reported losing less than $500 to their questionable publisher. However, another 31% reported losing more than $1,000, and one author admitted to losing more than $5,000.

Cantwell said it’s easy to blame the victim for falling for these scams – but that’s unfair. “‘Buyer beware’ only goes so far when you’re dealing with a professional con artist,” she said. “Someone new to the world of publishing is usually so flattered by a publisher’s interest in their work that they don’t even think to do a web search to see if it’s a scam. And that’s what these predatory publishers count on. That’s how they keep their businesses going.”

Twenty-eight percent of authors responding to the survey said they had reported their bad experience to an authority. Typically, reports like these are made to a state attorney general’s office, or to a watchdog organization like Writer Beware. However, two respondents said they had kept the incident to themselves because they were afraid that their publisher would sue them if they complained publicly.

Indies Unlimited co-administrator K.S. Brooks said the website decided to do the month-long series after hearing numerous stories from authors who had been scammed. “Some of these stories just break your heart,” she said. “There’s a ton of advice out there on the web about avoiding predators, but not many first-person accounts. So we decided to give these authors a chance to tell their stories, in the hopes that others would read them and think twice about signing up with a scammer.”

“At Indies Unlimited, we cover all facets of independent publishing, from writing and editing to publishing and marketing,” said founder Stephen Hise. “We hope our #PublishingFoul coverage will be a resource for authors for years to come.”

Indies Unlimited has been named in Publishers Weekly as one of the top six blogs for independent authors. The website is http://www.indiesunlimited.com.

 

Until Next Time…

Homonymns and More


I’ve gotten some more great tipsfromautocrit. This software has proven it’s worth to me over and over. I hope you enjoy the information.

Do you cringe when someone sends you an email and uses “there” instead of “they’re?” Me, too—and so do most readers.
That’s why we have the Homonym Analysis.
 
 
This nifty analysis helps you identify both homophones and homonyms so you can be sure you’re using the right word. 

Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings

: knew and new; too, to and two; or cite, sight and site, for instance.

Homonyms are words that are spelled the same but have different meanings. For example: Bear, to carry; and Bear, the animal that hibernates all winter.

The AutoCrit Editor highlights each potential homonym found in your writing.  When you click on the highlighted word, suggested alternate words are displayed (see figure below).  You can replace the word in question by clicking on one of the alternates displayed.



And if you’re not sure if you have the right one, just click the word and alternatives will display. A quick scan and you will be good to go!

 
Happy editing!
Until Next Time…

I wanted to share this article with everyone. To me, it’s a gold mine that you can review over and over. I hope it inspires you.

 

Back in 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats (now freelancing) tweeted 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar. Coats learned the ‘guidelines’ from senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories,tweeting the nuggets of wisdom over a 6 week period.

Last week, artist and User Experience Director at Visceral Games (a subsidiary of Electronic Arts), Dino Ignacio, created a series of image macros of the 22 rules and posted them to Imgur and Reddit.

Below you will find the list of image macros along with a text summary of Pixar’s 22 rules of storytelling at the end of the post. Enjoy!

[Sources: Emma Coats, Dino Ignacio, The Pixar Touch]

 

1.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (2)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

2.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (3)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

3.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (4)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

4.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (5)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

5.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (6)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

6.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (7)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

7.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (8)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

8.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (9)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

9.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (10)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

10.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (11)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

11.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (12)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

12.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (13)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

13.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (14)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

14.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (15)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

15.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (16)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

16.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (17)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

17.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (18)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

18.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (19)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

19.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (20)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

20.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (21)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

21.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (22)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

22.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (23)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

 

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on – it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

 

Original article at: http://twistedsifter.com/2013/09/pixars-22-rules-of-storytelling-as-image-macros/

Until Next Time…


It’s not often that you meet such a unique and amazing person, but when you do, embrace it. I’ve followed Dr. Sheri Kaye Hoff for the last few years, attended webinars, received coaching, and read her books. Everyone who follows my blog knows that I don’t make recommendations unless I truly believe in the person, the product, and their writing. She just released her new book and its free today! Here’s the information:

How would you like to put together everything that makes your heart sing and combine it into your life’s purpose? My friend and colleague, Sheri Kaye Hoff, PhD has done it and is showing you how in her new eBook, Relax Into Inspired Action: Connect the Pieces and Live Fulfilled. 

You can get it free for the next few days Click Here : http://www.lifeisjoyful.org/relaxedinspiredaction.html

You, like many people, probably feel at times like you are trapped into a never ending cycle of working harder and harder and sometimes it feels like there are even less results. We think the equation should be work really hard to create a great life and make more money. Often the equation is:  work really hard for a little bit of money. 

Relax Into Inspired Action eBook

Get it Free Here http://www.lifeisjoyful.org/relaxedinspiredaction.html

Now, don’t get me wrong, Sheri is actually a fan of effort. She grew up in a family with a strong work ethic. However, she found that there is a difference in the type of action you take and the results that you receive. Her definition of action that gets the results you desire – is relaxed inspired action- not desperate action or desperate reaction.

Over her years as a coach and her experience in training and development, she witnessed a process called connecting the pieces and living fulfilled. During this process you learn to put together all of the pieces that make you feel alive and passionate in your life into a business or career where you make a meaningful difference and are well compensated for your contribution to this world.

In this book, she shares connecting the pieces stories from a few remarkable women who have crafted their successful, fulfilling lives from the pain, suffering, and experiences that could have left them floundering. You will be inspired by them.

She also shares the core beliefs, action steps, and wisdom that will help you create your own connecting the pieces stories. Or if you are already in the process of connecting the pieces, you will fine tune and find ways to thrive and monetize what you are doing at a higher level. You will be motivated to take massive relaxed, inspired action steps.  (Just because it is relaxed doesn’t mean it can’t be massive).

Are you ready to Relax Into Inspired Action? And are you ready to Connect the Pieces and Live Fulfilled? 

Get it Free Here http://www.lifeisjoyful.org/relaxedinspiredaction.html

For additional information concerning Dr. Sheri and  her websites, please see below.

Dr. Sheri Kaye Hoff, PhD., M.A. CGCL
Relax into Inspired Action
Transformational author of multiple books.
 
“Life is an ongoing process of choosing between safety (out of fear and need for defense) and risk (for the sake of progress and growth). Make the growth choice a dozen times a day.” – Abraham H. Maslow
Phone: 720-432-0495
Scheduling Calendar http://meetme.so/sherikayehoff
Until Next Time…

Oh My Goodness!


I was catching up on my emails and saw I had some “funniest grammar / spelling mistakes from kids.” I had to share this one. I wonder if this child’s mom saved it to show them when they were 16 or 20 :) Yes, you are seeing my ornery side today, but watch the spelling! Kids and grammarUntil Next Time…

 

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