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Lacey kind of

I haven’t actually written a post for a while, but I hope everyone has enjoyed the reblogs.

If you follow my FaceBook page you know I’ve been busy running through edits with my editor and that the title of my novel changed from “Hidden Tears” to “The Truth She Knew”. My editor felt the new title encompassed the story on a much deeper level.

We are currently working on the cover as well as the blurb and I should be finalizing those soon. The other exciting news is that “The Truth She Knew” has changed from a stand alone novel to a series. I’m currently 30 pages deep into writing book two.

I also sent the novel to my first beta reader and here is a little bit of what she had to say.

“I cried, I laughed, I was hot mad, and I couldn’t put this book down. For the first time in my 46 years, I took a book with me to run errands and read it while waiting at the drive-thru! I’m going to dream about book 2 tonight just so I can know what happens next.”

I’ve learned so much from working with a professional editor and moving through the process of publishing. I’ve been surrounded by wonderful people that are supportive and excited. I don’t know what I’d do without them.

Until Next Time…

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plot-vs-characterI think plot vs. character has just as many opinions as outlining vs. pantsing. I’ve read great books that were plot driven with light character development and good books with fantastic characters and a flimsy plot. But, since writing two novels and part of my third I’ve found that the amazing books, the ones that stay with you years later, have both elements. They contain a page-turning plot and deep characters. When I say deep characters I mean human beings with internal and external challenges and emotions that readers can identify with.

So, instead of there being a debate about which should be stronger, I say knock it out of the ballpark and bring both to your story.

Until Next Time…

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The novel plannerI have five million things going on at any given moment, and if I’m not organized I’ll lose everything. Identifying this has certainly helped me in all aspects of my life, but especially my writing. And, I have to admit, I love exploring and finding cool stuff for writers. If it’s something that is fun or helps us become more successful, I’m on it.

With that being said I didn’t find this next tool before I planned my novel, but I am using it for my next book. Kristen A. Keiffer of She’s Novel came up with this brilliant planner that can be used for two books! She’s packed monthly and weekly calendars, brainstorming, a resource center, story idea list, and more into a planner that is easy to carry with you.

What’s also great about it, the price. You can purchase one on Amazon for only $16.19. Click here to see the planner and take a peek inside.

If you’ve also found some great tools to plan a novel I’d love to hear about them.

Until Next Time…

 

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save moneyI mentioned in my last post that I stomped around like a little kid when I thought about outlining my upcoming novel (click here to read “How I Saved Hundreds of Dollars On Editing“). In fact, I pretty much threw a fit for several weeks until I went back and visited Larry Brook’s website and printed off the beat sheet.

Now, anyone who follows Larry knows he’s a bit of a hard *ss. His delivery can be almost rude and can easily discourage new writers. But, he knows his stuff, and he’s excellent at what he does.

Here’s the link to the beat sheet so you can easily follow along. And, don’t forget, using this tool saved me hundreds of dollars in the developmental editing stage!  http://storyfix.com/blank-beat-sheet-form

After my temper tantrum, I looked over my freshly printed beat sheet and filled out what I already knew in the story. The ending came to me first, so I filled in what was the 3rd plot point, and then I backed up from there. I then wrote down my opening including my hook and wrote a brief sentence of the scene that happened next, then next, and then next until I reached plot point 1, midpoint, etc. Before I realized it, I had my book planned out. There were times I wasn’t sure what happened next, but reviewing the previous scenes helped me stay on track.

Now, what was amazingly easy was changing my one sentence when a scene changed. This happened several times as I wrote and the story developed, but since I had a strong foundation, I stayed on track with my story.

Do you know the most amazing thing that happened by using this tool? It’s not the money I saved, although that was fantastic. I had the first draft with NO MAJOR REWRITES! The development of the story was strong. By planning out the plot points and just a bit of information that connected my scenes together I had a solid rough draft.

Now, don’t forget that developmental editing is not copyediting. Developmental editing covers the plot, characterization, pacing, and story development. Every novel needs this type of editing as well as copyediting.

Stay tuned for the additional low cost and free resources I used to save hundreds of dollars on developmental edits.

Until Next Time…

 

 

 

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