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Great article from The Writer and great news for indie authors!

Today, a six-figure income – or at least a full-time writing career – is actually a possibility for independent authors.
By Patrick Walsh | Published: August 18, 2016


independent author book sales

 

Can self-publishing really become a lucrative full-time endeavor? Can indie authors ever begin to rival the income of traditionally published authors? A “yes” to either of these questions seemed but fable a few years ago. But today, a six-figure income – or at least a full-time writing career – is actually a possibility for independent authors.

Recently, an “Ask Me Anything” Q&A on Reddit caught my attention. It was hosted by independent author Chris Fox. Fox has been very successful in his career – so much so that he claimed to have earned $65,000 off his self-published books in 2015, and hopes to triple that in 2016 (meaning a six-figure income based on his eBook sales alone). In fact, he recently quit a six-figure salary in the software industry to write full-time. For a few hours, he answered a variety of questions from fellow writers and aspiring authors. (See the full Q&A here.) So I wondered: Is Fox an anomaly, or is this a rising trend?

 

Author Earnings Amazon salesCredit: AuthorEarnings.com

 

AuthorEarnings.com has published a report on this very subject, so I jumped into the data. Their May 2016 report reports 1340 authors earn over $100,000 per year on Amazon.com. The striking fact here: “Half of them are indies and Amazon-imprint authors.”

Surely this is just for eBook sales, right?  Brick-and-mortar print sales from the Big Five will most certainly bridge the gap and make up the loss in sales. Not true, Author Earnings finds.

“The author earnings gap between publishing paths is so wide among these six-figure-earning authors that once again brick-and-mortar print sales and the like cannot significantly alter the picture,” the report says.

Interestingly, Big Five-published authors make up a significant portion of the 100k-earners if they’ve debuted within the last 100 years. But if you narrow the timeline to those who’ve debuted within the last decade, indie authors make up an overwhelming amount of the big earners – see the figures here. The amount of high-earning, traditionally-published debuts dwindles as we get closer and closer to the present day.

This trend is also true for authors earning over $250,000 per year and over $500,000 per year. The data shows it: Independent authors are threatening the traditional model. It’s certainly an exciting time to be an independent author.

A bit about how these figures were discovered: Author Earnings use a software spider that crawls across Amazon’s bestseller lists, links to also-bought recommendations and through each authors’ full catalog. This resulted in a million-title dataset. You can download the raw data used to compile the statistics on Authorearnings.com.

Patrick Walsh is a serial entrepreneur and the owner of PublishingPush.com, which specialises in PR and book marketing. 

Keep writing! Until Next time…

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plot-vs-characterI think plot vs. character has just as many opinions as outlining vs. pantsing. I’ve read great books that were plot driven with light character development and good books with fantastic characters and a flimsy plot. But, since writing two novels and part of my third I’ve found that the amazing books, the ones that stay with you years later, have both elements. They contain a page-turning plot and deep characters. When I say deep characters I mean human beings with internal and external challenges and emotions that readers can identify with.

So, instead of there being a debate about which should be stronger, I say knock it out of the ballpark and bring both to your story.

Until Next Time…

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Once again, Colleen shares valuable information for authors!

Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer

There are some really great ideas and services offered here. READ the fine print and see if something works for you. ❤

Want to skip traditional publishing and share your work with the world? Bookmark this list of resources now.

Source: 28 Resources, Tools and Tips for Self-Publishing Your Next Book

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writer's toolsIf you missed the last two posts concerning saving money on edits, just hop on over and get caught up. Just click here and here.

Another priceless resource I used in my writing process was K.M. Weiland’s “Structuring Your Novel Workbook“. Although I didn’t use the workbook in  conjunction with her book “Structuring Your Novel” I found it incredibly helpful as a stand alone tool.

If you’re confused about how fiction books are structured, K.M. Weiland’s workbook will take you step-by-step in understanding and planning your plot points. Her books are clear and to the point.

K.M. is full of additional and free resources as well, but she is a powerhouse when it comes to structure.

I recognize there is controversy whether to plan or not but if you, at least, take the time to establish your hook, plot point one, two, three, and the climax of your story you will save yourself hours of stress and frustration. How do I know? Experience.

I hired an amazing editor who used to work for Harper Collins. I can’t say enough awesome things about her and even though I have plenty of edits for my novel I do NOT have rewrites, plot holes, issues with dialogue, and I only have minor characterization issues with one character. Not only would I have spent hundreds of dollars more if I had the above issues I might have given up when the edits came back.

Until Next Time…

 

 

 

 

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More moneyEveryone loves saving money, but sometimes I don’t want to go the extra effort to do so. This time, however, I did take the extra steps and I saved hundreds of dollars. I was thrilled!

If you’re following my posts on Facebook (facebook https://www.facebook.com/JAOwenby/) you know my upcoming novel was sent to my editor January 15th. I sent her 75 pages of my manuscript in order for her to present a scope of work and price. This is what she wrote back:

“I’ve spent some time with chapters of Tears in the Sun, and overall your development and plot are strong. You’re a good writer, and the story is intriguing. You only need light developmental editing.”

editor

I was so excited I didn’t sleep that night! The next day I finally got over myself and looked back at what I did that saved me money, and I laughed. The one thing I dreaded so much ended up being my best friend. And what was it? What did I do that not only saved me money but kept my sanity in tact?

I planned. I won’t say I outlined because that rubs people the wrong way just like it did me. When I began the novel I stomped around like a little kid and refused to outline. How dare it stop my creativity, who says I have to outline? This is MY book and I can break the rules if I want too. But, then I realized, that if someone’s intention is to become a best-selling author they need to act and think like a best-selling author and that means implementing solid strategies that WORK. Best-selling authors did not break the rules with their first several books.

Okay, enough said. We’re all intelligent people. If you dread the thought of outlining then there is another way than writing roman numerals and a. b. and c. under headings. I think so many people had that yucky experience in school that it throws them off when it comes to writing a novel. Give that old thinking a kick in the butt and allow the idea that there is something easier that will produce the same or even better results without losing your creativity! It will actually enhance it.

Over the next few posts, I’ll share the tools I used and also where you can grab them for yourself. These tools boosted my creativity, allowed me to shift gears when my characters demanded I go another direction, and actually KEPT me on track. At the time I was writing the novel I was working a part-time job, running my resume business part-time, selling a home, buying a new home, and moving. There were times I didn’t write for days, but on Sunday, my one day off, I would write 40-60 pages only stopping for pee breaks and snacks. I easily dialed back into the zone even when I had to go three weeks without writing a word! You can do it too.

Until Next Time…

 

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